Antique Native American Indian

Original Shoshone Indian Pipe Axe Tomahawk Forged Head Ash Haft Date to 1860

Original Shoshone Indian Pipe Axe Tomahawk Forged Head Ash Haft Date to 1860
Original Shoshone Indian Pipe Axe Tomahawk Forged Head Ash Haft Date to 1860
Original Shoshone Indian Pipe Axe Tomahawk Forged Head Ash Haft Date to 1860
Original Shoshone Indian Pipe Axe Tomahawk Forged Head Ash Haft Date to 1860
Original Shoshone Indian Pipe Axe Tomahawk Forged Head Ash Haft Date to 1860
Original Shoshone Indian Pipe Axe Tomahawk Forged Head Ash Haft Date to 1860
Original Shoshone Indian Pipe Axe Tomahawk Forged Head Ash Haft Date to 1860
Original Shoshone Indian Pipe Axe Tomahawk Forged Head Ash Haft Date to 1860
Original Shoshone Indian Pipe Axe Tomahawk Forged Head Ash Haft Date to 1860
Original Shoshone Indian Pipe Axe Tomahawk Forged Head Ash Haft Date to 1860

Original Shoshone Indian Pipe Axe Tomahawk Forged Head Ash Haft Date to 1860
The word tomahawk, sometimes simply called a hawk, was introduced into the English language during the 17th century. It is derived from the Powhatan Algonquian word tamahaac, which, in turn, comes from the Proto-Algonquian root temah, meaning to cut off by tool, or by an axe. The first contact with white traders brought natives the iron axe (called hatchet, hachotz or hatchette by the early Eastern explorers) and especially tomahawks with their hammer, spike or bowl on the poll end opposite the blade and its hollowed opening in the head for the shaft. A serviceable tool for daily chores, as well as for throwing, hand-to-hand combat or smoking, these combination tool-weapons immediately became one of the most highly prized items of barter with Indians out West. Nevertheless, by the early to mid-19th century, the iron tomahawk had become a standard trade item and fighting implement of frontier Indians. The tomahawk is in excellent condition with no repairs or damage.

Nice head forged from iron, most likely by a blacksmith on the frontier, then traded to the Shoshone, who in turn placed an ash haft into the eye and adorned it as seen. The head is a spontoon style fashioned after the Spanish weapons desired by the Native Americans. Ash haft is original to the head. The brass tacks are original old tacks. All along the haft are many ceremonial file branding marks made by placing a file or rasp in the fire until it was bright red and then burning the file into the haft.

This was done for aesthetic "looks" and ceremonial purposes. The haft is oblong, not the usual diamond or teardrop shape, this is a rare style.

There is one "shoulder" with drilled hole for attaching drops or beads. VERY NICE patina all over, really shows its age! The unusual style head is very desirable.

The star inlays represent the stars and constellations in the sky. A similar axe with the same style head is in the Museum of the Native American in Washington, DC. Conservatively dated to 1860 but may be earlier. The haft of the axe is measuring 24" long and the head is measuring about 12.5" long. Please ask any questions you may have. Thank you so much for looking! The item "Original Shoshone Indian Pipe Axe Tomahawk Forged Head Ash Haft Date to 1860" is in sale since Monday, March 4, 2019. This item is in the category "Antiques\Ethnographic\Native American".

The seller is "mejsoldit" and is located in Lexington, Kentucky. This item can be shipped worldwide.

  • Maker: Shoshone
  • Material: Iron
  • Original/Reproduction: Original


Original Shoshone Indian Pipe Axe Tomahawk Forged Head Ash Haft Date to 1860