Antique Native American Indian

Native American basket, large fish trap, possibly Hawaiian

Native American basket, large fish trap, possibly Hawaiian
Native American basket, large fish trap, possibly Hawaiian
Native American basket, large fish trap, possibly Hawaiian
Native American basket, large fish trap, possibly Hawaiian
Native American basket, large fish trap, possibly Hawaiian
Native American basket, large fish trap, possibly Hawaiian
Native American basket, large fish trap, possibly Hawaiian
Native American basket, large fish trap, possibly Hawaiian
Native American basket, large fish trap, possibly Hawaiian

Native American basket, large fish trap, possibly Hawaiian

I bought it years ago at a sale in Portland, Oregon. That is the opinion of a very respected Pacific Northwest weaving and basket expert. It is well known that the Portland, Oregon and Vancouver, Washington area had many early residents from the Hawaiian Islands. With this change came a shift in the village activity and population.

The numbers of Hawaiian employees increased, such that by the 1850s the village became known as "Kanaka Town, " or "Kanaka Village, " referring to the Hawaiian word for person. I do not know what material this fish trap basket is made from, but it is clearly all natural twigs branches and braided cording. Yes, someone long ago tied a few inches of fishing line on the top loop handle.

I have never even allowed this artifact to get near water. Dimensions: 31.5 inches long, 15.5 inches high, and about 22 inches wide. This hand made object is irregular and varies in dimension.

Please see photos The following quote is from from the website: hawaiialive. Org, under: Fishing Traditions: Hawaiians caught fish with simple bamboo poles and perhaps an pae (shrimp) or crab as bait. They also hand wove beautiful olon nets of various sizes, sometimes darkened with kukui nut juice, that could be individual throw nets or massive hukilau nets used by an entire community to fish the bays that dot the islands. Hinai, or basket traps, were used in another common method of fishing. Often limu kala, or some other variety of seaweed would be used to entice the fish into the woven basket trap.

Hawaiians were also skilled spear fisherman and one method called for using kukui nut torches at night. They even caught fish by hand, a method called hahamau that required great skill and patience. Knaka Maoli treated the catching of fish as an act dependant on the gods, offering gifts to the fishing deities and observing many kapu around it. The item "Native American basket, large fish trap, possibly Hawaiian" is in sale since Wednesday, November 5, 2014. This item is in the category "Collectibles\Cultures & Ethnicities\Native American\ US\1800-1934\Baskets".

The seller is "phocarock" and is located in Portland, Oregon. This item can be shipped to North, South, or Latin America, all countries in Europe, all countries in continental Asia, Australia.

  • Origin: "Probably Hawaiian" said a renowned basket expert


Native American basket, large fish trap, possibly Hawaiian