Antique Native American Indian

Antique Sioux Indian Scout Pipe Tomahawk US Army 1873 Etched Blade Forged Head

Antique Sioux Indian Scout Pipe Tomahawk US Army 1873 Etched Blade Forged Head
Antique Sioux Indian Scout Pipe Tomahawk US Army 1873 Etched Blade Forged Head
Antique Sioux Indian Scout Pipe Tomahawk US Army 1873 Etched Blade Forged Head
Antique Sioux Indian Scout Pipe Tomahawk US Army 1873 Etched Blade Forged Head
Antique Sioux Indian Scout Pipe Tomahawk US Army 1873 Etched Blade Forged Head
Antique Sioux Indian Scout Pipe Tomahawk US Army 1873 Etched Blade Forged Head
Antique Sioux Indian Scout Pipe Tomahawk US Army 1873 Etched Blade Forged Head
Antique Sioux Indian Scout Pipe Tomahawk US Army 1873 Etched Blade Forged Head
Antique Sioux Indian Scout Pipe Tomahawk US Army 1873 Etched Blade Forged Head
Antique Sioux Indian Scout Pipe Tomahawk US Army 1873 Etched Blade Forged Head
Antique Sioux Indian Scout Pipe Tomahawk US Army 1873 Etched Blade Forged Head

Antique Sioux Indian Scout Pipe Tomahawk US Army 1873 Etched Blade Forged Head
Native Americans have made up an integral part of U. Military conflicts since America's beginning. Colonists recruited Indian allies during such instances as the Pequot War from 16341638, the Revolutionary War, as well as in War of 1812. Native Americans also fought on both sides during the American Civil War, as well as military missions abroad including the most notable, the Code-talkers who served in World War II.

The Scouts were active in the American West in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Including those who accompanied General John J. Pershing in 1916 on his expedition to Mexico in pursuit of Pancho Villa. Indian Scouts were officially deactivated in 1947 when their last member retired from the Army at Fort Huachuca, Arizona.

For many Indians it was an important form of interaction with white American culture and society their first major encounter with the whites way of thinking and doing things. Recruitment of Indian scouts was first authorized on 28 July 1866 by an act of Congress; The President is authorized to enlist and employ in the Territories and Indian country a force of Indians not to exceed one thousand to act as scouts, who shall receive the pay and allowances of cavalry soldiers, and be discharged whenever the necessity for further employment is abated, at the discretion of the department commander.

There were different types of scouts, some enlisted as Indian Scouts for brief terms and there were others who were hired as scouts by the U. Some individual may have served at different times as a hired scout and an enlisted scout. Prior to the act in 1866 these scouts were considered employees rather than soldiers.

Enlistment records and muster rolls, from 1866 to 1912 were in many instances filed by state, some records were broken down by company or military post providing information such as when, where, and by whom the scout was enlisted; period of enlistment; place of birth; age at time of enlistment; physical description; and possibly additional remarks such as discharge information, including date and place of discharge, rank at the time, and if the scout died in service. Indian scouts who were officially enlisted in the army after 1866 were issued old pattern uniforms from surplus stock legally exempt from sale. Their uniforms were worn with less regulation, sometimes mixed with their native dress. In 1870, Captain Bourke of the 3rd cavalry described Apache scouts in Arizona as almost naked, their only clothing being a muslin loin-cloth, a pair of point toed moccasins and a hat of hawk feather. In 1876 a description of Crow Scouts reads that they wore, an old black army hat with top cut out and sides bound round with feathers, fur and scarlet cloth.

With the availability of army clothing some Native scouts took advantage of the availability of the clothing. In 1902 when new regulations were introduced in March the U.

Scouts received a new more regulated uniform. Antique authentic pipe tomahawk from the Indian Wars era. This pipe tomahawk was undoubtedly presented to an Indian scout who had shown valor and bravery in service of the US Army in 1873. The etching on the blade reads "US 7th SCOUT Co A sgt D 1873". The head is forged iron. Haft is ash wood with some very nice wear and patina seen, gives it an awesome look. Plenty of old brass tacks and file branding along its length. The haft has a slight curve in it due to more than a century of drying and humidity changes.

Very nice tomahawk from an important part of American history and Native American history. 10" long head, 20" long haft. This would make a good gift for any collector! Please ask any questions you have. The previous owner has lightly cleaned the head to make the etching visible.

Otherwise it was completely obscured by the patina. The item "Antique Sioux Indian Scout Pipe Tomahawk US Army 1873 Etched Blade Forged Head" is in sale since Friday, October 5, 2018. This item is in the category "Antiques\Ethnographic\Native American". The seller is "mejsoldit" and is located in Lexington, Kentucky. This item can be shipped worldwide.

  • Material: Iron
  • Original/Reproduction: Original


Antique Sioux Indian Scout Pipe Tomahawk US Army 1873 Etched Blade Forged Head